Camaguey

Camaguey

Camaguey

Camaguey province turns out to be a pleasant surprise for the travellers who decide to make a journey across the Island. Vast plains and abundant palm trees characterise the countryside scenery. Two clusters of low mountains stand out in the flat landscape: Sierra de Cubitas, to the North, is remarkable for its canyons cutting it deeply and transversely as well as for the presence of a great amount of archaeologically relevant caves; Sierra de Najasa, to the South, features fossil wood remnants, a dazzling natural marvel. Right in the very centre, as if emerging from the past, the capital city breaks through, full of magnificent bell towers and elegant old buildings that were once the core of the village Santa María del Puerto del Principe: a labyrinthine web of streets, alleys and squares unparalleled in the Caribbean region, declared Cultural Heritage of Humanity, in 2008.

Crystal clear waters and fine golden sand distinguish the beaches of Camagüey, the province having the largest amount of islets and keys in Cuba. There are over 120 km of beautiful beaches located either in the northern or the southern part of the province: a quarter of all Cuban beaches. Sabana-Camaguey is the northern-shore group of keys, a transit and nesting place for numerous species of migratory birds and the greatest pink flamingo natural reserve in the Western Hemisphere. Cayo Romano, particularly, was the landscape chosen by Ernest Hemingway to look for Nazi submarines during the Second World War as well as to go hunting and fishing. To the South, the Jardines de la Reina keys are exotic and have wild natural scenery, with abundant coral reef biodiversity and sandy beaches.

Among all these tourist highlights, the best thing visitors find on their journey is the people from Camaguey: gentle, proud, educated and attached to their land and traditions. Getting to know Camagüey and its people is a unique experience worth trying.